EDLD 5345 Human Resource Management

Week 5 Assignment

Overview

Your Week 5 assignment focuses on the instructional leadership role of a principal. A principal will need to conduct crucial conversations to promote professional growth as well as document the resources and support provided to members of the staff. This week will examine instructional coaching and how a principal can create a growth mindset environment, develop coaching skills, and start to gather resources for use in coaching conversations and documentation.

Rubric

Jim Knight suggests that all campuses have an instructional playbook that the campus uses in order to develop teachers and improve instruction the campus.  For this assignment, you will begin to design your own Instructional Playbook. You must include at least 5 instructional strategies and 5 checklists to match your strategies that can be used to monitor progress. You can research to find examples, use items found in the resource section, or use items that are used by your current campus.  Be sure to follow APA and cite where you retrieved the documents used. 

Use this rubric to guide your work on the Week 5 Assignment.

Tasks

Level 1: Does not meet the minimum criteria

Level 2: Approaches minimum criteria

Level 3: Meets minimum criteria

Level 4: Meets target criteria

Part 1

Creating an Instructional Coaching Program 

The candidate’s paper did not fully describe an instructional program or was not submitted.

The candidate’s paper contained 299-250 words and described the instructional coaching program for the campus.

The candidate’s paper contained 300 words and described the instructional coaching program for the campus.

The candidate’s paper contained more thoroughly described the instructional coaching program for the campus.

The candidate included less than 2 references.

(0 points)

The candidate included 2 references.

(9 points)

The candidate included 3 references.

(12 points)

The candidate included more than 3 references.

(15 points)

Part 2: Section A

Instructional Playbook

Section B:

The candidate’s Instructional Playbook included less than 3 instructional strategies and did not include the corresponding checklist for the strategies or did not submit.

Failed to describe how strategies would be used on the campus or did not submit.

(0 points)

The candidate’s Instructional Playbook included at least 3-4 instructional strategies and 3-4 checklists to match your strategies.

Described how strategies would be used on the campus and used in 199-150 words.

(6 points)

The candidate’s Instructional Playbook included at least 5 instructional strategies and 5 checklists to match your strategies.

Described how strategies would be used on the campus and used at least 200 words.

(9 points)

The candidate’s Instructional Playbook included at more than 5 instructional strategies and 5 checklists to match your strategies.

Described how all strategies would be used on the campus thoroughly.

(12 Points)

Part 3: Section A & B

Candidate analyzes data collected from observations, Candidate performance and documentation to, determine an area of need and formulates recommendations to create an instructional coaching plan.

Domain II: Competency 3, A Competency 4, A Competency 5, A &B

Competency 6,A

NELP Standard 7

Candidate provides little description instructional practices and student impact. (K)

Candidate created questions that support the teacher in uncovering the highest leverage gaps in their performance. (S)

Candidate provided little description/information on instructional changes needed by the teacher and evidence to support the plan components was not noted. (S)

Best Practice Research and citation was not included in the plan. (K)

(0 points)

Candidate provides limited analysis and instructional practices observed. Evidence from 1 data point was provided. (K)

Candidate created only 1 leverage reflective question to support the teacher in uncovering the highest leverage gaps in their performance. (S)

The candidate’s plan identifies a high leverage instructional change needed by the teacher and provides evidence to support the plan components. (S)

The plan provides clear definition of high-quality instruction based on current research based best practices and 1 article was referenced. (S)

(27 points)

Candidate provides in-depth analysis and feedback of the instructional practices and student impact. (S)

Evidence from multiple data points was provided.

Identified a targeted instructional practice area of need for the teacher based on the data. (S)

Candidate created 2-3 leverage reflective questions to support the teacher in uncovering the highest leverage gaps in their performance. (S)

Candidate explains the impact of campus culture in creating, implementing and stewarding a school vision aligned to campus goals briefly, and may lack clarity and/or specificity. (M)

The candidate’s plan identifies at the best high leverage instructional change needed by the teacher and provides evidence to support the plan components. (S)

The plan provides a clear exemplar on the strategy suggested for future use by the teacher. (M)

2-3 articles are referenced. (M)

(30 points)

Candidate provides in-depth analysis (specific examples) and feedback of the instructional practices and student impact (specific examples). (S)

Identified an instructional practice area of need for the teacher based on the data and best practice research. (S)

Uses language from the TTESS rubric to justify decision making. (S)

Candidate created more than 3 leverage reflective questions. (S)

Candidate explains the impact of campus culture in creating, implementing and stewarding a school vision aligned to campus goals with clarity, specificity, and depth. (M)

The candidate’s plan identifies at the best high leverage instructional change needed by the teacher and provides evidence to support the plan components. (S)

The plan provides a clear exemplar on the strategy suggested for future use by the teacher connecting it to the research providing modeling. (M)

More than 3 articles are referenced. (S)

The plan provides multiple data points. (S)

The plan Includes concrete action steps, documentation, timeline, and monitoring progress. (M)

(36 points)

Section C:

The candidate failed to submit two pieces of documentation to be used to make personnel decisions.

(0 points)

The candidate provided one to two pieces of documentation. The documents did not contain information that could be used to make personnel decisions.

(9 points)

The candidate provided one piece of documentation to be used to make personnel decisions.

(12 points)

The candidate provided two pieces of documentation to be used to make personnel decisions.

(15 points)

Initial Discussion Board Post(s)

(6 points)

The candidate does not address the discussion prompt.

(0 points)

The candidate very minimally addresses ALL discussion prompts.  AND/OR            Does not address all discussion prompts. AND/OR          Content exhibits quantity, not quality contribution and vague comprehensive of knowledge.

(2 points)

The candidate addresses ALL discussion prompts with one or two sentences per prompt.      AND/OR      Content exhibits quality contributions and adequate comprehensive of knowledge.

(4 points)

 The candidate addresses ALL discussion prompts with a minimum of one, well-developed paragraph per prompt.            AND                          Content exhibits quality contribution and thorough comprehensive of knowledge.            

(6 points)

Response to Initial Posts

(6 Points)

The candidate does not respond to any other candidate’s initial post.

(0 points)

The candidate very minimally responds to at least one other candidate to ALL discussion prompt. AND/OR                  Does not respond to at least one other candidate all discussion post.      AND/OR                Responses do not exhibit any meaningful assessment toward other’s contributions.      

(2 points)

The candidate responds to at least one other candidate to ALL discussion prompts with one or two sentences per prompt.  AND/OR       Responses exhibits vague assessment toward other’s contributions.   AND/OR Response contains occasional grammar and spelling errors.

(4 points)

The candidate responds to at least one other candidate to ALL discussion prompts with at least one, well-developed paragraph per prompt.                AND                       Responses exhibits critical assessment toward other’s contributions.           

(6 points)

Writing: APA Citations, Spelling, and Grammar

No response

 (0 points)

The student had more than 3 errors in APA citations, spelling, or grammar.

(5 points)

The student had 2-3 error in APA citations, spelling, or grammar.

(7 points)

No errors in APA citations, spelling, or grammar & correctly formatted.

(10 points)

Week 5 Assignment, Part 1: Creating an Instructional Coaching Program

The first part of this week’s assignment asks you to look at some of the resources that could help you support teachers and manage the documentation within an instructional coaching model. Since the TTESS model isn’t single snapshot but is a continuous growth model in order to provide feedback and support to grow a teacher professionally a key component of this model will be instructional coaching. The purpose of this assignment is to allow you to become familiar with the resources available and begin to consider what type of documentation to collect for an effective performance evaluation and monitoring system. This week’s assignments will also allow you to start to gather tools that you can use as you move into leadership positions.

Read the following articles:

Knight, J. (2016). What good coaches do. Educational Leadership,69(2), 18-22. (W5LO3, CLO6)

White, A.S., Howell Smith, M., Kunz, G. M., Nugent, G.C. (2015) Active ingredients of instructional coaching: Developing a conceptual framework, National Center for Research on Rural Education, 2015(W5LO3, CLO6)

Kemerer, F.R. & Crain, J.A. (2017) Texas documentation handbook: Appraisal, nonrenewal, termination. Austin, TX: Texas School Administrators Legal Digest.  (W5LO2, W5LO3, CLO2, CLO6)

Read Chapter 6.

Watch the video:

Knight, J (2016, April 12). Seven success factors for instructional coaches (YouTube). Retrieved from https://youtu.be/6cp6cEykJzo. (W5LO3, CLO6)

Write paper discussing how you would develop an instructional coaching program on your future campus.  Be sure to discuss the key ingredients, structures, and skills you will need to develop to have an effective program. You will want to make references to at least 3 of the key items you learned in this week’s readings or the video.  It must be at least 300 words in length. Follow the APA guidelines for citations. Double spacing is not necessary. Paste your paper in the box below.

     The main reason for failure in strategic initiatives is the lack of execution (or lack of effective execution).  As leaders we have good intentions when we create an instructional coaching program, but good intentions may not be enough when it comes to driving and sustaining growth—including when it comes to your coaching initiatives.  Based on what I’ve read on What Good Coaches Do, I feel that it is important to be mindful of equality, choice, voice, dialogue, reflection, praxis, and reciprocity to encourage teacher buy in and motivation to self-improve. 

When developing an instructional coaching program, my focus will be on key ingredients: (1) connecting coaching to instructional expectations, (2) consider the number of coaches available in the building and who is coaching them, (3) instructional coaches and administrators must be calibrated on what effective instruction looks like, (4) and ensuring that my teachers are being coached to be masters of their content and pedagogy. The first step I’d take is to ask myself is how are my coaches and I connecting coaching to existing goals, district and state curriculum, and instructions expectations for alignment? There are many great approaches to coaching and coaching coaches, but what is most imperative is deciding how we can cater to our students while aligning state and district expectations to our campus goals and vision.  Staff needs to be committed to moving forward with our campus goals and vision, and to encourage such commitments, instructional coaches not only need to be well educated in their specialty, they must know how to enroll teachers and offer coaching as one of many ways in which they can conduct professional learning (Knight, 2016).

The second ingredient to creating an instructional coaching plan is to consider how many coaches our campus currently has and to manage how they will be used for the number of teachers in needs to be serviced.  The third component I will consider when creating my plan is to ensure that administrators and coaches are calibrated on what effective instruction looks like.  Providing and receiving feedback between teachers, coaches, and administrator needs to be calibrated around specific standards for coaching is more productive.  As Knight said, “When one teaches, two learn” (Knight, 2016). Last of all, I will ensure that my teachers are being coached to be masters of their content and pedagogy.  College-and career-readiness requires teachers to provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge across disciplines and to the real world. In addition, teachers need to make sure that students learn to be problem-solvers and be able to seek information from multiple sources to problem-solve. This approach absolutely requires teachers to be masters of their content. This practice called praxis, involves application of new knowledge and skills, students and teachers learn together what effective teaching and learning looks like.

Resources

Knight, J (2016, April 12). Seven success factors for instructional coaches (YouTube). Retrieved from https://youtu.be/6cp6cEykJzo.

Kemerer, F.R. & Crain, J.A. (2017) Texas documentation handbook: Appraisal, nonrenewal, termination. Austin, TX: Texas School Administrators Legal Digest. 

White, A.S., Howell Smith, M., Kunz, G. M., Nugent, G.C. (2015) Active ingredients of instructional coaching: Developing a conceptual framework, National Center for Research on Rural Education, 2015

Week 5 Assignment, Part 2: (W5LO1, W5LO2, W5LO3, CLO6)

Section A: Creating an Instructional Playbook

Jim Knight suggests that all campuses have an instructional playbook that the campus uses in order to develop teachers and improve instruction the campus.  For this assignment, you will begin to design your own Instructional Playbook. You must include at least 5 instructional strategies and 5 checklists to match your strategies that can be used to monitor progress. You can research to find examples, use items found in the resource section, or use items that are used by your current campus.  Be sure to follow APA and cite where you retrieved the documents used. 

Copy and Paste your Instructional Playbook below.

Academic Vocabulary and Language

In One Sentence

·         Academic vocabulary and language is used in academic dialogue and text and may not necessarily be encountered in conversation, though it relates to more familiar words that students use, such as observe rather than watch.

The Hattie Check

·         Student prior knowledge and background 0.35; Reciprocal Teaching 0.75; Teacher Clarity 0.75; Teaching Student Learning Strategies 0.93

·         Understanding academic vocabulary and language helps students to understand oral directions and classroom instructional dialogue and to comprehend texts across different content areas, including math, science, and social studies/history.

·         Academic vocabulary and language must be taught explicitly (especially to the ELL student groups) to help students understand directions and comprehend texts

What’s the Point?

·         It is the language that students must master in order to succeed in any content area.

What are some Types of Vocabulary and Language?

·         Listening Vocabulary: The words that we hear and understand.

·         Speaking Vocabulary:  The words that we use when we speak.

·         Reading Vocabulary: The words we understand when we read text.

·         Writing Vocabulary:  The words we can retrieve when we write to express ourselves.

What is involved in Vocabulary Intervention?

·         Tier 1 – basic words (happy, clean, fast)

·         Tier 2 – high frequency words; mature language users; multiple meanings; used in many settings (cluster, sympathy, estimate)

·         Tier 3 – low frequency, specific to classes such as: science/math/social studies (lathe, chasm, warp)

·

Types of Vocabulary and Language

Type

Definition

Fact

Listening

The words that we hear and understand

By the time we reach adulthood, most of us will recognize and understand close to 50,000 words.

Speaking

The words that we use when we speak

Most adults use a mere 5,000 to 10,000 words for all their conversations and instructions.

Reading

The words we understand when we read text.

We can read and understand many words that we do not use in our speaking vocabulary.

Writing

The words we can retrieve when we write to express ourselves.

Our writing vocabulary is strongly influenced by the words we can spell.

Vocabulary Intervention Strategies

ü 

Active Engagement

Repetition of small words

Oral to written language

Give definition in student friendly terms

Ask for antonym

Repeat

Effective Questioning

In One Sentence:

·         Research finds that teacher questions (and cues) are effective when they focus on what is important, require students to respond at higher levels, provide adequate wait time after a question is asked and establish an engaging introduction for the lesson.

The Hattie Check:

·         Strategies Emphasizing feedback 0.82;  Scaffolding 0.82; Strategies to integrate prior knowledge 0.93

·         Asking effective questions prompts deeper answers and engages students in a wide range of critical thinking tasks.

What’s the Point?

·         Proper questioning can be used to develop critical thinking skills in students as well as assess whether your students understand what you're teaching.  This requires the teacher to be able to come up with the right questions in order to get students to provide responses that are both relevant and of high standard.

What are some ways of creating effective questions?

·         Use effective guiding questions:  Teachers must also pitch questions effectively to raise the thinking challenge, target specific students or groups within the class.

·         Use questions effectively with students:  Help teachers move students from simple responses, to engage in more developed complex thinking.

Checklist:  Effective Guiding Questions

ü 

Address the standards.

Identify the knowledge students need to learn.

Identify the skills students need to learn.

Identify the big ideas students need to learn.

Address meaningful and/or important topics.

Address personally relevant topics.

Use the most appropriate words.

Keep language easy to understand.

Prompt students to use learning strategies.

Prompt students to use technology.

Prompt students to use communication skills.

Checklist: Using Questions Effectively with Students

ü 

Ask questions of all students.

Use repeat, rephrase, reduce, and reach out.

Celebrate mistakes.

Avoid giving away the answers.

Provide sufficient wait time.

Cooperative Learning

In One Sentence:

·         Students in small heterogeneous groups take roles and learn to share knowledge and tasks with one another through a variety of structures with this strategy.

Hattie Check:

·         Jigsaw 1.2; Meta-cognition/Self-Regulated Learning 0.75

·         Common features of effective cooperative learning include team building positive interdependence, group interaction, structured activity, and individual accountability.

What’s the Point?

·         Cooperative learning is an educational approach which aims to organize classroom activities into academic and social learning experiences.

What types of strategies are used in cooperative learning?

·         Jigsaw strategy:  Each group member is assigned a different piece of information. Group members then join with members of other groups assigned the same piece of information, and research and/or share ideas about the information.

Checklist: Cooperative Learning Success Factors

ü 

The teacher clearly understands the learning structure.

The teacher has created a psychologically safe environment.

The teacher has written expectations for how students should act, talk, and move while they perform the cooperative learning activity.

Students have learned the expectations for how to act, talk, and move during the cooperative learning activity.

Students have learned and use appropriate social skills to ensure they interact positively and effectively during the activity.

The teacher has carefully considered the optimal makeup of each group of students.

The teacher has given students sufficient time for each activity, without providing so much time that the learning loses intensity.

Students have additional activities they can do if they finish their tasks before others.

The teacher has planned additional activities to use during the class if activities take less time than planned.

The teacher has planned how to adjust the lesson plan if activities take more time than planned.

The teacher uses an effective attention signal.

Checklist: Jigsaw

ü 

What group they will be in for the first activity (perhaps by writing down the number for their group).

What group they will be in for the second activity (again, perhaps by writing down the number for their group).

How they are to work together to learn and summarize what they are learning.

The product they need to create to share with the second group.

Before moving to the second group, that what they have created has received their teacher’s stamp of approval.

How they should communicate with each other in both groups (in particular how they should listen and talk).

How they will record (usually take notes or fill out a learning sheet) what they learn from their fellow students in their second group.

Peer Teaching/Collaboration

In One Sentence:

·         An instructional approach in which students become the teachers in small group reading (or other content) sessions.

Hattie Check:

·         Seeking Help From Peers 0.83; Transfer strategies 0.84

What’s The Point?

·         The learner or student is the primary focus of instruction.

·         Interaction and "doing" are of primary importance.

·         Working in groups is an important mode of learning.

·         Structured approaches to developing solutions to real-world problems should be incorporated into learning.

What strategies are involved in peer teaching?

·         Cooperative Learning: Students sit together, helping the others do their work.

·         Flexible/strategic grouping: Informally grouping and regrouping students for a variety of purposes throughout the school day or during an instructional unit supports the learning of all students.

·         Project-based learning:  Projects are typically framed with open-ended questions (How do we reduce our school's carbon footprint?) that drive students to investigate, do research, and/or construct their own solutions.

Checklist: Cooperative Learning Success Factors

ü 

The teacher clearly understands the learning structure.

The teacher has created a psychologically safe environment.

The teacher has written expectations for how students should act, talk, and move while they perform the cooperative learning activity.

Students have learned the expectations for how to act, talk, and move during the cooperative learning activity.

Students have learned and use appropriate social skills to ensure they interact positively and effectively during the activity.

The teacher has carefully considered the optimal makeup of each group of students.

The teacher has given students sufficient time for each activity, without providing so much time that the learning loses intensity.

Students have additional activities they can do if they finish their tasks before others.

The teacher has planned additional activities to use during the class if activities take less time than planned.

The teacher has planned how to adjust the lesson plan if activities take more time than planned.

The teacher uses an effective attention signal.

Checklist: Flexible/Strategic Grouping

ü 

Teacher considers student learning profiles.

Students are able to move frequently among groups according to their specific needs.

Teachers look at assessment data, test results, student needs, and abilities in order to determine the group size.

Teachers identify the most effective grouping design. For example, group students by gender, previous group, student selection, or teacher selection.

Teacher create a color-coded system or chart to help teacher (and students) know which group(s) they are in.

Teacher gives specific instructions about the tasks groups must perform.

Post written instructions and expectations so you don’t have to repeat yourself.

Model and practice routines and procedures for getting into and out of groups. Develop a routine so your classroom isn’t utter chaos after a group task is complete.

Set a specific time limit for students to complete their group work. It’s best to set an alarm so students know when the alarm goes off, they must proceed to the next activity quietly.

Implement a student learning log for each group they are in. A color-coded one works best for students to keep track and record what they completed in each group.

Checklist:  Project-based Learning

ü 

Teacher maps standards to the project challenge, ensuring learners use the standards as a way to exhibit their thinking from the lowest to the highest levels of thinking as they find their own answers to authentic challenges.

Teacher builds a classroom community with routines and schedules.

Teacher builds students’ ability to explore, uncover, and solve challenges while, at the same time, developing their reading and writing ability.

Maximize formative assessment to maximize use of formative assessments throughout the project to monitor our learners as they master the standards.

Teacher provides authentic challenge to activate intrinsic motivation.

Hands-On Learning

In One Sentence:

·         Hands-on learning is an educational strategy that directly involves learners by encouraging them to do something in order to learn about it.

Hattie Check:

·         Field Independence 0.68; Effort 0.77

What’s The Point?

·         Someone with a Kinesthetic learning style has a preference for physical experience - touching, feeling, holding, doing practical hands-on experiences.

What are some examples of Hands-on-Learning?

·         Kinesthetic/Tactile learning: Students will be best able to perform a new task by going ahead and trying it out, learning as they go.  This learning style includes physical experiences such as touching, feeling, holding.

·         Students are encouraged to act, talk, and move as a way of gaining experiences as they learn about a new topic.

Checklist: Kinesthetic/Tactile Learning

ü 

Teacher (or students) will write out checklists of materials to be learned or looked for.

Students will trace words and diagrams on paper.

Students are provided and can use textured paper and experiment with different sizes of pens, pencils, and crayons to write down information.

Students will use role play or dramatize concepts. Students can move objects around to dramatize a concept or act out the concept themselves.

Teacher will ask the student to envision a scene in which the material to be learned is being used or acted out somehow.  For example: a student could imagine being a character in a novel.

Have the student take notes (on paper, word processor, in textbooks) while reading or listening.

Teach students how to use some form of body movement (snapping fingers, pacing, mouthing ideas) while reciting material to be learned.

Checklist: Act, Talk, Move Expectations

QUESTIONS FOR DEVELOPING “ACT” EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENTS:                                                     

What learning goal should students be working toward?

What does excellent work look like?

QUESTIONS FOR DEVELOPING “TALK” EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENTS:                                                                                                                         

Can students talk during this activity?

What topics are appropriate for conversation?

What topics are not appropriate for conversation?

How loudly can students talk (library voice, inside voice, conversational voice, hockey game voice)?

QUESTIONS FOR DEVELOPING “MOVE” EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENTS:                                                                                                                     

For what reason, if any, can students leave their seat?

Do students need permission to leave their seat during those times?

How should students act when they leave their seat? (How quickly should they move? May they talk with anyone? How many times can they repeat the process?)

Resources

Killian, S. (September 24, 2017).  The Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching.  Retrieved from http://www.evidencebasedteaching.org.au/hatties-2017-updated-list/

Knight, J. (2018).  The Impact Cycle:  What Instructional Coaches Should Do to Foster Powerful Improvements in Teaching.  Retrieved from https://resources.corwin.com/impactcycle/student-resources/instructional-coaches%E2%80%99-toolkit

Student Learning Objectives. (2015).  Instructional Strategies List.  Community Training and Assistance Center and Washoe County School District, Nevada.

Section B: Describe how each item in your Instructional Playbook will be used on your future campus. It must be at least 200 words. Use citations when needed.  Double spacing is not necessary. (W5LO1, W5LO2, W5LO3, CLO6)

Please copy and paste your paper below.

I would use an Instructional Playbook as a tool to have my teachers use needs assessments, instructional rounds, student achievement data, and research to base their instructional straties to help all students grow academically as well as socially and emotionally.  The Instructional Playbook would be a collaboration between teachers and administrations.  It will involve research on high-impact instructional strategies, determining a small number of high-impact, powerful strategies, and ensuring that all students are included in the plan. The playbook will be used to train principals as well as instructional coaches and teachers.  The purpose of training the playbook is to provide coaching support to teachers, support professional development, support school and district improvement efforts, and to support district balanced assessment programs.  Each part of my Instructional Playbook focuses on researched strategies on effective questioning and learning/instructional approaches that is geared towards encouraging and teaching students how to build and strengthen higher order thinking skills as well as build self-regulated learning, reflection, and assessment.  The playbook also includes the teaching and learning how to use collaborative learning and peer teaching, both strategies which proves successful in improving student achievement in the classroom.  I will continue PD for all administrators and teachers throughout the school year.  The Instructional Playbook will be a continuous growing document as new research based high-yield strategies develop. 

Week 5 Assignment, Part 3:

During this course we have examined human capital, documentation, support, and evaluation staff.  You have looked at data for a teacher and created documentation to use for evaluation and employment purposes.

This week, you will review the previous data on this teacher along with the other data points provided in this document.  You will score out the teacher’s latest evaluation using the TTESS rubric and develop an instructional coaching plan to leverage reflection, best practices and support to improve this teacher’s pedagogical skill levels and impact student achievement. You are asked to research best practices in instruction and to develop a cohesive instructional plan with an exemplar, concrete action steps, instructional support, and a monitoring system that is supported by the research and TTESS instructional rubric.

Section A: Analysis of teacher documentation and Instructional Coaching Plan- Assessment Instructions (W5LO2, W5LO3, CLO2, CLO3, CLO6)

Directions: Please read the data points that are available to you prior to developing a coaching plan for this teacher.  You will need to review the observation evidence sheet, the data set, rubric to determine where the teacher is instructional.  You will want to read You will also want to look at your documentation from week 4, your refinement plan from week 4, and your instructional playbook from this week.  After reviewing all your information, you will need to find 3-5 research articles to support the instructional practice you are asking the teacher to implement in this coaching plan. You might also find the resources section in the document helpful as you create an instructional coaching plan that will help move this teacher forward in improving her instructional craft.  The TTESS Rubric will also be needed as a resource for this task. https://teachfortexas.org/Resource_Files/Guides/T-TESS_Rubric.pdf

Place the links to those articles in the Instructional Coaching Plan under research to support.  Be sure to APA citations for your articles.

Section B: Creation of questions for teacher’s instructional reflection (W5LO2, W5LO3, W5LO4,CLO2, CLO3, CLO6)

Directions: Once you have identified the teacher’s area of need, you will again review the data/documentation that you have for this instructional area. Next you will review the research to determine your suggestion for how to improve the area of need and support the teacher. Finally, for section B you will need to craft 3-4 reflection questions to help guide the teacher through the reflection process of their instructionally practice and its impact on students. You might also want to consider follow up questions in case the teacher is struggling to reflect.

These questions will be put into your Instructional Coaching Plan.

Data Collected and placed in the file of the struggling teacher

Ms. Cardinal’s Classroom Demographics

Hispanic

71%

White

15%

Asian

5%

Economically disadvantaged

90%

English-language learners

32%

Special education

11%

Additional information on Ms. Cardinal

2nd year as a teacher

The teacher has struggled with classroom management.

The students in the class have the highest-grade averages but the lowest scores on the district’s benchmarks.

There are 23 students- 4 ESL and 3 Special education students.

Walkthroughs indicate the following:

Lack of wait time

Lower level questioning

Calling on the same student

A teacher driven classroom

Classroom management issues

Lack of differentiated instruction

Lack of details in lesson plans

Evidence Notes from walk-throughs this month

Instructional groups are arranged in all boys or all girls…. all of the same ability level

All students are aware of their role within the group…note taker, timer, materials, leader.

The teacher showed two videos that did not align with the objective of the day.

Each group was given an iPad.  Only 2 of the 5 groups used the iPad.

Materials were not readily accessible for students.

Two of the six activities in the lesson aligned with objective. Ex. Worksheet on Parts of a Seed…Obj. was to learn about the parts of an animal cell…no reference to prior learning on a seed. Two videos…One on cell division and the other about the animal kingdom.

Questioning was mostly in knowledge and comprehension.

Ex. What is this part? Look at the example to give you a clue. After 3 students 1 was able to answer. What is a cell? Called on 4 students…Teacher finally answered.  How are animal cells different from plant cells? In your group create a poster that matches this model of an animal cell. Do animals have cells?  Can you give me an example of an animal cell? No student called on was able to answer. The teacher closed the lesson without an answer.

The teacher directed most of the activities and the students waited for her to tell them every step of the activity before completing it.

T-TESS Observation Evidence Sheet

Domain 1: Planning

Dimension

Evidence

Rating

1.1 Standards and Alignment

Objective was posted- Referenced only at the start of the lesson.

Each group was given an iPad. Only 2 of the 5 groups used the iPad.

Videos shown did not match the objectives.

T ran out of time and closed with put up your materials and line up at the door.

Improvement Needed

1.2 Data and Assessments

During this semesters data conference T brought benchmark 1 scores. T had not drilled down the data to determine instructional needs or strategies to help students master the content.  The teacher has provided parents with report cards and progress notes.  Coaching notes attached.

Goal sheets attached.

Developing

1.3 Knowledge of Students

Referenced learning from yesterday and connected it to today’s assignment at the beginning of the lesson.  Reviewed student folders during data meeting and PLC teacher know overall weakness but not drilled down. 

Developing

1.4 Activities

Questions- answered by same three students Jay, Mary, Jeff. 

  Instructional groups are arranged in all boys or all girls…. all of the same ability level

All students are aware of their role within the group…note taker, timer, materials, leader.

The teacher showed two videos that did not align with the objective of the day.

Each group was given an iPad. Only 2 of the 5 groups used the iPad.

Materials were not readily accessible for students.

Two of the six activities in the lesson aligned with objective. Ex. Worksheet on Parts of a Seed…Obj. was to learn about the parts of an animal cell…no reference to prior learning on a seed. Two videos…One on cell division and the other about the animal kingdom.

Questioning was mostly in knowledge and comprehension.

Ex. What is this part? Look at the example to give you a clue. After 3 students 1 was able to answer.

What is a cell? Called on 4 students…Teacher finally answered. How are animal cells different from...?

plant cells? In your group create a poster that matches this model of an animal cell. Do animals have cells? Can you give me an example of an animal cell? No student called on was able to answer. The teacher closed the lesson without an answer.

The teacher directed most of the activities and the students waited for her to tell them every step of the activity before completing it.

Improvement Needed

Domain 2: Instruction

Dimension

Evidence

Rating

2.1 Achieving Expectations

During Questioning- Teacher would answer instead of rewording or prompting student to get them to answer. What is this part? Look at the example to give you a clue. After 3 students 1 was able to answer.

What is a cell? Called on 4 students…Teacher finally answered. How are animal cells different from...?

plant cells? In your group create a poster that matches this model of an animal cell. Do animals have cells? Can you give me an example of an animal cell? No student called on was able to answer. The teacher closed the lesson without an answer.

No assessment on today’s objectives on the board.

Teacher directed instruction.

Most students could not answer questions during the lesson.

S groups completed the group assignment and had/followed their roles

Developing

2.2 Content Knowledge and Expertise

T- Academic Vocabulary was used.

Group work- Monitoring

Not connected to other disciplines

Didn’t adjust questioning or prompt

Developing

2.3 Communication

Did not elaborate/adjust questioning in the lesson.  Roles were clear, and students understood group task.

Asked mostly remember/understand questions

Verbal and written communication were appropriate.

Developing

2.4 Differentiation

Grouping- same gender and same ability group

Provides differentiated instructional methods and content for one group during the group work.

Developing

2.5 Monitor and Adjust

Rarely adjust the lesson when students could not answer the questions.

Data during the preconference showed 50% mastering this unit's work.  Teacher didn’t have a current plan/strategy to help those struggling students and felt that they would master it at the end.

Walk Throughs- showed no monitoring adjusting.

Instructional Coaching- has had 1 modeling of adjusting questions and moving up and down Bloom’s 

PLC group- questioning strategies focus this semester.  No evidence noted of implementation

Improvement Needed



Domain 3: Learning Environment

Dimension

Evidence

Rating

3.1 Classroom Environment, Routines and Procedures

Most procedures, routines and transitions provide clear direction, but others are unclear and inefficient.

Teacher driven

Materials were not readily available.  Also noted in 1 walk through.

Classroom was safe and accessible

Developing

3.2 Managing Student Behavior

Inconsistent use of behavior

Ex 1 student given multiple warnings and did not correct behavior.  Ignored him at the end of the lesson.

1 student was told after 2 warnings that she would serve a detention afterschool…behavior adjusted.

Analysis of discipline data for first two six week’s shows the teacher has 12 referrals.

Instruction Coach- currently working behavior management.  2 sessions completed.  Attended WS a month ago…. implementation?

Improvement Needed

3.3 Classroom Culture

Establishes a learning environment where most students are engaged in the curriculum.

Students are sometimes disrespectful of each other. Noted in group time and teacher addressed it to each group.

Developing

Please Complete your Coaching Plan using the template below:

Instructional Coaching Plan

Date of the Conference: February 23, 2019                                            Teacher: Mr. Smith

Targeted Coaching Topic: More Student-Driven Activities

Reflection Questions:

Questions I would have Mrs. Smith keep in mind when developing activities. 

  1. What outcome do you expect students to accomplish by the end of each group session?
  2. How will you ensure equal participation and accountability for all students?
  3. How do you develop activities that are aligned to the learning objective?
  4. How do you structure your groups to meet the needs of all your students?

Evidence from the Observation(s):

Mrs. Smith needs to be able to provide questions that encourages higher-order thinking. 

Allow for participation and activities to be more student driven.

Arrange groups based on the needs of  the students by putting them in groups where they can benefit from one another at different levels to ensure success and understanding.

Ensure that all activites, resources, technology or instructional materials being provided for the activities are properly aligned for the intended instructional purposes.

Clearly assign, explain, and model expectations/roles within each group for students to effectively and proficiently complete each activity.

Identify the targeted goal: (SMART GOAL)

Mrs. Smith, plans engaging, flexible lessons that encourage higher-order thinking, persistence and achievement.

Research to support the need to improve this area:

Browder, D. M., Spooner, F., Wakeman, S., Trela, K., & Baker, J. N. (2006). Aligning Instruction with Academic Content Standards: Finding the Link. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 31(4), 309–321. https://doi.org/10.1177/154079690603100404

Drost, B. R., & Levine, A. C. (2015). An Analysis of Strategies for Teaching Standards-Based Lesson Plan Alignment to Preservice Teachers. Journal of Education, 195(2), 37–47. https://doi.org/10.1177/002205741519500206

Mohamud, A., & Fleck, D. (2010). Alignment of Standards, Assessment and Instruction: Implications for English Language Learners in Ohio. Theory into Practice, 49(2), 129-136. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/40650726

Suggested strategies and skills:

Mrs. Smith will  look at the descriptors related to the content when she begins to design her lesson with several activities to ensure the students are involved in the activities and actually learning.

Model/Explain/Exemplar:

After the lesson, Mrs. Smith will walk the students through each activity and expectations to ensure that the students know exactly what to do and reiterate the objective of the lesson.

Evidence- How will we know it worked or was effective?

The students are able to work in groups and had a clear understanding of their roles and the expectations of the activity. All activities and resources provided were proplerly aligned for the intended instructional purposes. There was evidence of equal participation and accountability for all students. Students were arranged in groups based on their needs.

Timeline:

Mrs. Smith will continue to work on this plan throughout the school year, but we will meet throughout the school year to discuss progress and concerns.  At the end of the year, I expect to see growth in this area from Mrs. Smith and a better understanding on how to create engaging, flexible lessons that encourage higher-order thinking, persistence, and achievement.

Adjustments:

Mrs. Smith, will include activities that will allow all students to be involved,  opportunities for them to utilize their individual learning patterns, habits and needs to achieve high levels of academic and social-emotional success, and all the activities will be connected to students’ prior knowledge, life experiences, and interests.  She will also make sure it is student-centered.

Support/Resources:

Mrs. Smith, will explain the activities and expectations. She will model each activity prior to having students begin, so that they have a better understanding of what it should look like when it’s their turn to do it. The activities supported the objective. Students will have opportunities to interact with each other when they work in pairs or share their work. Mrs. Smith, will provide choices to to ensure understanding. While the students are working on the activities, Mrs. Smith will be walking around the room monitoring, observing,  and providing support when needed.

Section C: Documentation of Coaching and Support (W5LO4, CLO2, CLO3, CLO6)

As an administrator, you are in control of the support and resources on your campus. In order to show support and resources were provided to this teacher you will want to have documentation and structures to show monitoring. 

You will need to create 2 additional documents showing the support or resources provided to this teacher. You might want to revisit your reading in the Texas Documentation Handbook.

Please copy and paste them in the space below.

Form 1

Mrs. Smith’s Support Plan

Identify

Mrs. Smith met to analyze data, set behavioral and academic goals, and identified strategies on how to align instruction with district and state expectations

Actions taken:

plan engaging, flexible lessons that encourage higher-order thinking, persistence and achievement

attend professional development for classroom management and science curriculum and instruction

use data to create flexible groups for small group instruction and intervention

Learn

Mrs. Smith will  implement the strategies learned from having attended professional development on classroom managemet. Mrs. Smith will be provided support through modeling, co-planning and co-teaching, with an instructional coach as well as with an experience grade level science teacher  This will allow opportunities for peer observation. Feedback on walk-throughs will be provided after support has been utilized.

Actions taken:

Instructional Coach Co-teaches and models strategies and techniques that ensure rigorous core instruction for all learners.

Co-plans instructional units with teachers using effective instructional practices.

Observes teachers and provides feedback with a focus on students’ academic achievement.

 Conducts teacher-driven conversations to promote reflection and to identify next steps.

 Provides timely and specific feedback that helps adult learners grow and improve their instructional practices.

Improve

Mrs. Smith’s implementation of strategies learned was observed and recorded on quick walk throughs.  We met every month to collaboratively analyze data from walk-throughs, student assessment scores, and student monitoring notebooks to assess whether or not the goals were being met and addressed any concerns as well as shared feedback to ensure that both teacher and administrator are calibrated on moving forward and making continuous progress.

Actions taken:

Teacher uderstands effective instructional practices and implements the practices.

Coach supports teachers’ individual and group efforts to meet all students’ needs and to implement core instruction.

Coach supports teacher in using differentiated instruction in small group setting.

Teachers uses differentiated instruction.

Coach helps teacher select and implement appropriate instructional practices.

Teacher plans for high-quality professional learning that is integrated and embedded into day-to-day teaching and learning, and that aligns with the school and district visions and missions.

Form 2

Effective Instruction Walk-Through

Teacher:

Date/Time:

Subject/Lesson:

Observer:

+/-

Observed

Comments

Provides opportunities to practice with teacher support and guidance

Matches level of materials to student’s instructional need

Incorporates manipulatives, graphic organizers, and/or hands-on activities

Checks for understanding with prompts

Clarifies misconceptions/reteaches if necessary

Uses positive, motivating feedback

Provides multiple opportunities for teacher supported and independent practice to promote automaticity

Makes connections across the curriculum and provides questions and activities for development of higher order thinking skills

Frequently monitors students working independently to minimize opportunities for practicing incorrectly

Grouping formats observed during lesson (Circle) Whole group Small group (teacher-led) Small group (students) Pairs One-on-one

Students grouped for instructional purpose (e.g., one-on-one, pairs, small group)

Students grouped based on same-ability need

Students grouped based on mixed-ability

System for students to know group assignment for activity

Data supporting grouping assignments available (e.g., grouping mats, data notebook, etc.)

Small-group instruction and activities are differentiated to meet needs of student in groups

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